Pet

Everything you need to know about Pet Therapy

Animals that visit hospice facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, retirement communities, and schools are known as therapy pets. Although dogs tend to be the most popular therapy animals, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and horses are also suitable options. These adorable animals are well-behaved, well-trained, and approachable. They also have a strong work ethic! Horses, fish, and other creatures that pass screening requirements can also be employed, though. The therapeutic objectives of a person’s treatment plan will determine the kind of animal that is used. Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) is a formally organized series of sessions that aids patients in achieving particular therapy objectives. 

Benefits

Pet therapy strengthens the human-animal link that already exists. Many physical and mental ailments can be helped by interacting with a lovable pet. This may lessen tension, ease pain, and enhance your psychological well-being. There are numerous ways to employ pet therapy. Therapy must have clearly defined goals, and at scheduled sessions, your development will be tracked and recorded.

Therapeutic Visitation

The most popular form of pet therapy is therapeutic visitation, in which owners bring their own animals to visit medical facilities. Many individuals who are in hospitals miss their pets that they left behind. A visit from a pet can encourage someone to improve so they can go back home to their own furry family members.

Animal Assisted Therapy

Animals that have undergone particular training to aid physical and occupational therapists with their patients are used in animal-assisted therapy. Patients’ fine motor skills and limb mobility can improve when they pet their pets’ fur. Think about the positive effects a game of fetch could have on a patient’s physical AND emotional condition! Additionally, therapy animals teach patients new pet-care techniques that they can use to look after their own animals when they get home.

Facility Therapy

Facility therapy is quite unique. These care facility-based therapy animals are taught to keep an eye on and interact with individuals suffering from mental disorders like Alzheimer’s. They assist in keeping the residents secure by getting to know their restrictions and boundaries.

Best Match

Pet therapy can be helpful for people of any age who are dealing with long-term or temporary physical, mental health, or emotional issues. Pet therapy benefits a variety of people, including bedridden patients and more active inhabitants. Young and elderly alike enjoy comfort, entertainment, and distraction in having a pet around! Consequently, pet therapy is accessible to almost everyone. If their immune systems are healthy, cancer patients receiving chemotherapy could enjoy having a pet by their side as they receive their treatments. Psychological therapy for those suffering from PTSD or other emotional problems may be facilitated by pets. Lowered blood pressure brought on by pet contact may benefit those with heart issues and hypertension.

Therapy animals are not service animals, despite the fact that they are frequently registered as such. Service animals provide support and live with a disabled person. Therapy animals are typical pets that live with their owners. They visit patients in medical facilities, but they do not “belong” to any one patient and they are not trained especially to provide aid. Therapy animals provide a valuable role in the medical field by aiding people of all ages with a range of emotional and physical conditions. While our pets do a lot for us, we also do a lot for them. And therapy animals go even further in improving people’s moods. Simply say “Good job!” then.

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