Entertainment

20 Minutes Film Based on the True Hawaii Missile Crisis in 2018

Vern Miyagi is using two cell phones at the same time, and both of them are chirping and moving around the table. Even if nothing else is wrong, the fact that Vern can’t enjoy his Saturday morning because of the noise shows something is wrong. He is at his Hawaii Kai home, drinking coffee, reading the paper, and playing with his phone.

In the movie “20 Minutes,” the lives of twelve people are turned upside down when they are told they only have twenty minutes to live because a ballistic missile is coming toward Hawaii.

Parts of the plot are based on the fake nuclear missile alert in Hawaii in 2018, which was felt by all 1.5 million people who live there. As soon as the emergency alert was sent to every cell phone in Hawaii and the rest of the country, there was panic everywhere.

Here is the you tube link:

 The movie’s missile looks like a real one.

In the movie, an incoming missile threatens many people’s lives, including a Japanese tycoon and a Native Hawaiian, a Republican and a Democrat, an agnostic and a believer, and an atheist and a believer.

Chey says, “It doesn’t matter where they come from or what tribe they are from, they all come together.” Many people said they broke down in tears during the last few minutes.

A representative from RiverRain Productions said, “This great movie has an interesting mix of people,” which is why the story is so interesting. We can’t help but be inspired by Tim, and this new photo only adds to that feeling.”

The movie’s first showing at the Cannes Film Festival in France was sold out. The movie premiere at Cannes was one of the festival’s most talked-about and anticipated events. All of the tickets were bought for the show. On both screens, there is a white box with black writing. At the top, the words EMERGENCY ALERT are written in big, bold letters. Below that, it says “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT

Vern is surprised but not too worried. Someone who worked for him at the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency sent the alert. Still, no one has yet called him. He also can’t hear the sirens strategically placed around the island of Oahu. His agency had only started testing this tone a month before to tell the difference between a missile alert and the flat screech of a tsunami warning. And he tells his workers to hit the button on the control panel to turn on the sirens bintangplus4d.

Vern retired as a major general after 37 years of service. His last job was in the Pacific Command. Because of his training and routine, he can quickly spot possible dangers and rule out doubtful ones. North Korea is the only country that has its nuclear weapons and military. Its missiles can reach both Hawaii and the mainland.

Final words

Still, it’s not clear if a warhead could survive re-entry into the atmosphere, and the targeting technology is probably so old that an attack would be more like “horses and hand grenades” than a surgical one. Hawaii is closer to Pyongyang than Washington, D.C., by more than 2,000 miles, so it makes sense that it would be the most likely target. But Kim Jong-un hasn’t done anything recently that suggests he’s thinking about killing himself, and firing a missile at Honolulu would almost certainly kill him. Kim decided just five days ago to send athletes to the Olympics murah4d.

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